Aug 17, 2018

Posted by in BUDDHISM IN OTHER LANGUAGES, PUBLIC ARTICLES | 49 Comments

WHY DO WE CALL HIM “THE BUDDHA”? (Vì sao gọi là đức Phật)

WHY DO WE CALL HIM “THE BUDDHA”? (Vì sao gọi là đức Phật)

WHY DO WE CALL HIM “THE BUDDHA”?

One day while visiting a pagoda, my daughter asked me: “Dad, our family is Buddhist, right?” I nodded without hesitation. Then she pointed at a blissful statue of the Buddha in the sanctum: “Why do we call him ‘the Buddha’ instead of ‘God’, ‘Saint Tran’, or ‘Confucius’…?” Baffled, I answered, “Because the Buddha founded Buddhism, Confucius founded Confucianism, Jesus Christ founded Christianity…” “But besides the different names of belief systems, does the title means anything else?” – asked my daughter, unsatisfied with the answer. By then, I understood that this question could not be simply answered but rather required a deeper level of analysis. It surprised me for touching on the essence of the Dharma and addressing an epistemology that is needed to be proved.

We came to and sat down under the bodhi tree. Beautiful white clouds were floating across the blue sky. If the clouds did not exist, the sky’s meaning would be incomplete. Likewise, I pondered, if the Buddha did not reincarnate as a human, the value of his liberation would not be perfect.

In my opinion, the proper nouns of the venerables are not simply used to differentiate different belief systems. I do not entirely understand the explanations for those proper nouns such as “God”, “Allah”, and “Confucius.”  However, the proper noun “Buddha” has a profound meaning that we can thoroughly understand. Buddha is the proper noun for Ven. Gautama after realizing the Perfect Enlightenment. The story about the meaning of this proper noun has been passed down from generations to generations, and documented in the second book of the Anguttara Nikaya scripture:

…One day, a great Brahmin came and asked the Buddha why he had such a title. The Buddha smiled and answered: “I am called the Buddha because I have these following conditions: One, I know what is needed to know. Two, I renounce what is needed to renounce. Three, I practice the Dharma that is worth practicing. For those reasons, I am called the Buddha.”

This declaration infers that anyone who fulfills those conditions will be called a Buddha and vice versa. Since non-Buddhists lack those necessary and sufficient conditions, they remain trapped in Samsara. We are the children of the Buddha and carry in us His seeds, thus we must understand the meaning of these three conditions. By this understanding, we will sow our seeds. Then regularly, we will water them, so the seeds will sprout, grow branches, leaves, flowers, and finally, fruits.

In the first argument, the Buddha has taught us to “know what is needed to know.” This knowing is transcendent, unlike the knowledge of non-Buddhists. In the Buddha’s time, non-Buddhist leaders had extensive knowledge, but their knowledge is unworthy of knowing. By this teaching, the Buddha has emphasized the importance of the knowledge that will bring benefits to oneself, to others, and to the final liberation, which also fulfills the condition – “know what is needed to know.” This is called the “liberation knowledge.” Aside from this, the remaining knowledge is only for decorating the ephemeral values of a human life.

Even social relationships in daily life have certain standards to abide, let alone in the scope of liberation. Many ancient proverbs, such as “learn to eat, to speak, to wrap, to unwrap” or “one day of travel will bring you a wealth of wisdom”, all conclude in one argument “know what is needed to know.” Regarding this same need, Confucius, a great philosopher of Confucianism – the standard for social etiquette and culture, once said: “There are three ignorances in life to avoid. They are ‘knowing what is not needed to know’; ‘not knowing thoroughly what has already known’, and ‘not knowing what is needed to know.” Confucius was born after the Buddha. His entire life was dedicated to indoctrinating about human social etiquette. Building from personal and social experience thousands of years ago, his arguments still hold practical values nowadays. In fact, in this century, which is viewed as the most advanced era in human history, people tend to specialize in their own fields and professionalize those fields in every aspect, instead of scattering their energy to minor matters that are unrelated to their goals.

However, in the scope of liberation from Samsara, Confucius is still uncertain; he only showed the way for “self-cultivation, household arrangement, domestic governing, and world peacekeeping.” What happens after death is still a mystery. One day, a disciple asked him: “Dear Master, do people after death still see and aware?” Confucius answered: “If I tell you that people after death still see and aware, I afraid the young will die with their elders. Yet, if I tell you that people after death cannot see and aware, I afraid no one will worship their elders. Thus, wait until you die, and you will know the answer!” This historical conversation has shown that Confucius only had a limited knowledge about liberation.

Other masters, even the Buddha’s teachers before his enlightenment such as Ven. Kalama and Ven. Uddaka Ramaputta, only knew that people will reincarnate in heaven despite having attained a high level of meditation, up to Four-empty. However, while heaven is full of bliss, it remains inside of the Samsara.

In summary, knowing what is not needed to know wastes our time and effort, for meaningless goals or limited benefits. For practitioners who aim for a reincarnation in heaven, the heaven is still limited. They can practice as far as they can comprehend, but in the end, they still fail to attain liberation. This is called aberrant knowledge.

So, what exactly is the knowledge that is needed to know, as the Buddha has mentioned? The Buddha has clarified, that we need to know (1) what are sufferings, (2) what are the causes of suffering, (3) what are the methods to eliminate suffering, and (4) where is the realm of liberation from all suffering. These are the “Four noble truths.” Those people who never realized the nature and causes of suffering never eliminate suffering. And without the elimination of suffering, they will never reach the realm of liberation. All 96 Non-Buddhist systems in the Buddha’s time did not know about the Four noble truths and therefore, committed “knowing what is not needed to know.” Secondly, according to the Buddha’s teachings, karma runs in a Twelve-fold chain (or Twelve Nidanas), from the first link – ignorance (or stupidity, lack of knowledge) to the last one – death. These twelve primary links form layers upon layers of karma that bring people into the labyrinth of Samsara. Thereafter, the Buddha has taught that all Dharmas are impermanent (or subjected to birth and death), and never exist eternally like many arguments from non-Buddhists. The “Diamond Sutra” addresses the impermanence of all Dharma with metaphors such as “a lightning’s flash”, “a snowflake in the air”, “an illusory trick”, “a drop of dew” … In one of his extraordinary writing – “The thirty-seven practices of all the Bodhisattvas”, Guru Thogme Zangpo has stated: “Life-long friends and relatives must eventually bid farewell. Wealth accumulated with sweat and tears must eventually abandon. Consciousness, a guest who lodges in this body, must eventually depart. Do not attach to this life. That is the practice of all Bodhisattvas” (the fourth practice). Simply understand this, anything that does not remain with us after death is impermanent. Even a billionaire dies empty-handed. He could not bring his money along into Bardo. He could not eat a piece even though when he was still alive, there were hundreds of dishes for a meal. Likewise, there exist many similar phenomena in this worldly life.

In the second argument, the Buddha has taught us to “renounce what is needed to renounce.” In this context, we must understand that “renounce” means to give up, to withdraw from, and not to cling on. So, what exactly is needed to renounce and what is not? Non-Buddhists also practice renouncing. However, the acts they consider renunciations are quite bizarre. Some religions renounce eating rice but allow other types of food. Some religions renounce clothes; their practitioners are naked anytime, anywhere. Some religions renounce human postures; their practitioners walk like animals…Is it possible that those bizarre behaviors are the acts of renunciation for the sake of spiritual attainments?! The Buddha has never taught such renunciations. He mostly taught us to renounce in our mind, not on our body, which means to give up our clinging mentality. Some people thought they had renounced desires just by leaving their family, dressing in the monk robes, and chanting some sutras. However, regardless of their monkhood, they still live with worldly cravings, social matters and still desire material benefits. This practice is not considered renunciation because it is only applied externally, through body and speech. The Indian Guru, Atisa, who came to Tibet in the eleventh century to revive Tibetan Buddhism, once taught: “Do not declare yourself a monk if you look for worldly material necessities like lay people. Living a monastic life means to give up worldly activities. If you keep thinking about the things you have given up, you have no right to declare, ‘I am a monk living in a monastery.’ If you keep assimilating to outsiders and wasting your time in vain, worldly discussion with them, though you are living in a monastery, you must not declare, ‘I am a monk living in a monastery.’ If you feel disadvantaged out of your own impatience, if you could not help anyone with anything, do not brag that you are a Bhikkhu Bodhisattva.

 

The Buddha has taught that renunciation is mostly about keeping our mind from clinging to the eight worldly winds. It is not about leaving our homes or wearing monk robes. My daughter’s friend, whose Buddhist name is Dieu Thanh, enjoys visiting pagodas and chanting sutras. She is always happy when she is there but then turns sad when she comes home. She has an intention to leave her family, insisting that only by living in pagodas may she find peace and happiness. However, if Dieu Thanh’s statement is true, why there still exist many disturbing issues inside the pagodas. If it is true that familyhood will only bring disturbances, why the expression “home sweet home” is still commonly used? In short, all arguments are derived from one origin – Only renunciation in mind that will bring peace and happiness, because, at that moment, we give up our clinging to the phenomena and circumstances. Since ancient time, our ancestor has taught: “First – practice Dharma at home, second – in the market, third – in pagodas.” In fact, according to Guru Atisa’s teaching mentioned above, anyone who lives in pagodas but remains delusional could not be considered a monk. In the Dhammapada Sutra, the Buddha has stated:

One is not a monk
for begging almsfood,
One is a true monk
for keeping precepts.

Meanwhile, many practitioners try to become vegetarians, as if vegetarianism was a practice of dietary renunciation. They denounce or view non-vegetarians as polluted. This is, in fact, a clinging mentality instead of renouncing, because vegetarianism was never mentioned as a necessity in any Buddhist scripture. In Buddha’s time, when the Sangha begged for food, they ate whatever was available instead of picking vegetarian or non-vegetarian foods. Nowadays, the Sanghas in Theravada countries still carry out this practice. In Tibetan Buddhism, there are schools that require vegetarianism and there are schools that do not. However, not because a monk is non-vegetarian must he loses his monkhood.

In Vietnamese, the original definition of vegetarianism, or “CHAY”, is “TRAI”. “TRAI” means “pure” and purity is in our mind, not on our body or in our speech. Therefore, there is the phrase “TRAI TỊNH, TRAI GIỚI” (purification, pure precepts) instead of “CHAY TỊNH, CHAY GIỚI.” If the practice of eating vegetarian foods is to avoid meat and develop compassion, it is considered a correct renunciation. If the practice of eating vegetarian foods is to enjoy the taste or to polish one has ego, then practice is merely an expression of one’s clinging mentality; such practice even non-Buddhists like Hinduism, Caodaism, Hoahaoism can do. On a more extreme level, in Buddha’s time, there were practices that limited food consumption down to one sesame seed per day, way far surpassed a typical vegetarian diet. Still, without knowing the right method of renouncing, their minds could not reach the final liberation and attain Nirvana.

If an American billionaire is not mindful of his contentment, he will never stop working for more money. Along with this excitement is the feeling of incompleteness, discontentment, and disappointment. Without a will for monetary renunciations, he will suffer. By knowing how to content, even a poor person can feel completed and happy with his current condition. This is called “peacefulness.” Such practice is indeed, considered a right renunciation. There is the case of the president of Heineken Inc., a billionaire who only stopped working at the age of 72 after diagnosing with cancer. In contrast, Bill Gates yielded his position right at the peak of his career and donated half of his fortune to charity. From then on, he became passionate about this mission. A celebrated movie star, Jackie Chan, donated half of his fortune to charity funds. Just recently, he expressed his intention to donate all that remains. This is the renunciation of material possessions, a part of the renunciation of monetary clinging. However, this is not the completion of renunciation. The Buddha stated that the nature of renunciation is non-comparing, non-discriminating, and adapting, which means “modest with foods, modest with seats, modest with clothes, modest with medication.” This mentality has been solidified by the Buddha’s teaching in “The Eight Great Causes of Enlightenment” sutra:

“The Third Cause:
The mind is insatiate,
embracing desires,
and increasing our sins.
The Bodhisattvas are different,
always stay content,
with modesty, retain the Path,
take solely wisdom as career.”

Ven. Dromtonpa

In Tibetan Buddhism, there is a well-known story about renunciation between Ven. Dromtonpa and an old, diligent lay Buddhist. It goes like this:

“One day, seeing a layperson circumambulating the Radreng temple, Ven. Dromtonpa approached and said, ‘I’m glad to see you circumambulating the temple, but is it better if you can practice Dharma?’ Listening to the suggestion, the old man thought he should chant Mahayana sutras. Seeing the old man chanting the sutras in the monastery yard, Ven. Dromtonpa said, ‘I’m glad to see you chanting the sutras, but is it better if you can practice Dharma?’ The old man then thought he should meditate, so he sat on a cushion and start meditating. Ven. Dromtonpa then said, ‘I’m glad to see you meditating, but is it better if you can practice Dharma?’ The layperson could not stand the confusion, he asked, “Dear Venerable, please tell me how to practice Dharma.” This time, Ven. Dromtonpa answered, “Stop clinging to this life, right at this moment. Because if you are still attracted to this life, no matter what you do, it will not be considered a Dharma practice as it yields to the eight worldly concerns (Gain – Loss, Honor – Dishonor, Praise – Criticism, Pleasure – Pain). Once you have renounced those worldly mentalities and abstained from the worldly concerns, every action will bring you to the liberation.”

 

ITA’s Director – Master Thinley Nguyen Thanh

This is a lively example about renunciation. Later, when writing his masterpiece – “Eight Verses of Training the Mind,” Ven. Dromtonpa ended his poem with a verse, in which he advised everyone to renounce their worldly lives:

“May they are not corrupted by,
Eight world winds and wrong-views
Realize all illusive appearances.
May they renounce all attachments.”

In the third argument, the Buddha has taught us to “practice the Dharma that is worth practicing.” Non-Buddhists also practice, but since their practices are incorrect, they cannot attain liberation from Samsara. The Brahmins practice to for a reincarnation in Brahma’s heaven. Jainism practitioners live an ascetic lifestyle and meditate all day to unify their inner universes with the greater universe of Brahman. Most practitioners from Buddha’s time practice with a selfish goal, which is to depart from this worldly life and enter the blissful world of heaven.

The gods of Sensuous heavens might live long for thousands of years but they do not live forever. According to Buddhist texts, before they die, the gods will develop “five attenuate symptoms” – the flowers on their heads will wither, their bodies will sweat, they will feel anxiety just by sitting for a long time, their clothes will be stained, and their halo will fade. Before reincarnating to a lower realm, they will be sent to the heaven’s garden where they must wait for the next 7 days. This will be the moment when they feel most miserable. They can no longer enjoy pleasures like they used to. Knowing which lower realm they will reincarnate into, the gods will become even more miserable! Why so? Because the gods feast and travel freely; they sing, they dance and engage in sensual activities all days, every day without accumulating any merit needed to be reincarnated as a human. Even Indra, the heaven’s king who rules 33 kingdoms of heaven was absolutely terrified in the near-death moment. He looked for an answer from the beings of higher heavens, but no one could help. The gods of Formless Heavens might be the highest beings in Samsara, but when they die, it is as painful to them as piercing thousands of arrows through their hearts. In summary, in all 28 realms of heaven from Sensuous to Formless, beings must face a disastrous ending. For this reason, non-Buddhists practices are certainly unworthy of practicing.

So what Dharma is worthy of practicing? In Buddhism, there are many different practices; with suitable applications depending on each individual’s nature, all these practices can lead to liberation. During the latter period of Buddhism, Tantrayana, also known as Vajrayana, had developed many unique liberating practices. Vajrayana originates from an argument, in which the practitioners attain Form Body by visualizing the Yidam (Yidam Yoga) and more specifically, they visualize themselves with the Form Body of an Enlightened One (a Buddha). Along with this practice is another vehicle, the Mantras. In His book “Tantra in Tibet”, His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama stated that Tantra uses the result as the path, similarly to Form Body, which means meditating (or visualizing) on the Form Body of a Yidam until the appearance becomes so clear, so solid it seems to be touchable by hands and visible in real life to the eyes. This is called contemplation on the outer Buddha.

The Dala Lama 14th

Secondly, we visualize ourselves as the Yidam and generate our divine pride, renouncing the inferiority mentality that causes us to feel ordinary or useless. We transform all those negativities through the “machine” of contemplation to create what is noble like the Buddha’s nature. At first, contemplating ourselves as the Buddha (or Yidam) might seem unnatural. However, if we exercise this practice diligently, we will realize the self-manifested Buddha exists in our mind, clearer and clearer, right in our daily life, and enhance our virtues to a higher level. We will unify our mind to the Buddha’s by experiencing our senses of body, speech, and mind. This is a unique cause to attain Buddha’s nature. This is called contemplation on the inner Buddha.

Avalokiteshvara

Mantra is the transcendent language of the Buddhas and Bodhisattvas, manifested from the great insight Samadhi, solidified from all transcendent essence of the universe. “Mantra” in Sanskrit means “guarding the mind” (from impurities and disturbances). We can understand that Mantra is the vehicle to give grace and remove sufferings. According to many Tantric scriptures, Mantra has these five following powers, (1) REVERENCE (practitioners who read the Mantras at a certain level will receive respect and favor from humans, gods, and demi-gods), (2) BENEFIT INCREASE (gaining worldly benefits such as longevity, health, and success), (3) ADVERSITY DECREASE (adversities decrease from a lot to a little, from a little to none), (4) ABSORPTION (absorbing the subtle energy from the universe), and (5) TAMING (exorcising demons who seek to harm people). During Surangama Dharma festival, the Buddha has taught that even the Bodhisattvas have to chant mantras.

Tantrayana utilizes and extracts the energy from the Mantras. This skillful Tantric vehicle, along with meditating on the Holy image of the Yidam, has created the magnificent and transcendent characteristic of Tantrayana.

Tantrayana utilizes and extracts the energy from the Mantras.

In general, the proper noun “Buddha” is not just a notion about a leader of a belief system, but a notion about an Enlightened and Liberated One. Those arguments were discovered by Ven. Gautama, and by this discovery, he became the Buddha. Once he had become the Buddha, the Enlightened One, the Liberated One, the Buddha solidified this experience and conveyed it to the Brahmins as a lesson of liberation knowledge: KNOW WHAT IS NEEDED TO KNOW. RENOUNCE WHAT IS NEEDED TO RENOUNCE. PRACTICE THE DHARMA THAT IS WORTH PRACTICING.

Thinley – Nguyên Thành

Translated by Mat Nhat Nguyen


Vietnamese version: VÌ SAO GỌI LÀ ĐỨC PHẬT?

  1. Tantra Amishuta says:
    Dear Holy Guru,

    Thank you for this article, it goes deep in detail of what we must give up and what we must learn. These are so important to true happiness and in being in the moment. These are so important to being liberated. Thank you for sharing. Om Mani Padme Hum May you be well for the sake of all and may we continue our path to liberation with each and every new lesson.

    • Kính bạch Thầy!

      Con xin phép được dịch comment của đạo hữu Tantra Amishuta sang tiếng Việt như sau:

      “Kính bạch Thầy tâm linh tôn quý!

      Con cảm tạ ơn Thầy cho con được đọc bài viết này. Bài viết của Thầy cho con hiểu rõ xả ly những gì cần xả ly. Điều quan trọng là chúng con đạt được hạnh phúc chân thật, an trú hiện tại và đạt được giải thoát tối thượng.

      Con cầu nguyện Thầy trụ thế lâu dài vì sự lợi lạc của tất cả chúng sanh.

      Cầu nguyện chúng con tinh tấn đọc bài hàng ngày để được đi trên hành trình giác ngộ.

      Om Mani Padme Hum.”

  2. Siramitra. says:
    Venerebol Guru.

    My name is tantra siramitra.

    I really like this article, very profound, and very interesting indeed!!

    May Avery one be happy!!

    OM MANI PEDME HUM……

    • Kính bạch Thầy!

      Con xin phép được dịch comment của đạo hữu Tantar Siramitra sang tiếng Việt như sau:

      “Kính bạch Thầy tâm linh tôn quý!

      Con là Tantra Siramitra.

      Con rất thích bài viết này của Thầy. Quả thật, bài viết rất sâu sắc, ý nghĩa và lợi lạc.

      Cầu nguyện tất cả chúng sanh được hạnh phúc.

      Om Mani Padme Hum.”

  3. Name *marta irene guagliana says:
    Querido Santo Guru : Profundo  y claro , este interesante articulo. Muchas gracias , por compartirlo . En el nos enseña , lo que tenemos que renunciar …y lo que debemos aprender .  Que nuestro Guru , tenga una larga y feliz vida.  Que todos los seres sensibles disfruten de la felicidad y la raiz de la felicidad. Puedan ser libres de sufrimiento y de la raiz del sufrimiento . que o esten separados de la gran felicidad carente de sufrimiento . Que habiten en la gran ecuanimidad , libre de pasion , agresion y prejuicios. Que la bondad y la compasion de la sabiduria de la no dualidad. Que la preciosa bodhichita haya nacido en aquellos donde no lo es.Puede que Bodhichita una vez que nazca no decaiga y se expanda mas y mas . Que el precioso espiritu del despertar nazca en aquellos donde no esta. Que una vez que nazca , no se deteriore y aumente cada vez mas. OM MANI PADME HUM
  4. DHARAM PAL , CHANDIGARH , INDIA says:

    Respected Holy Guru,

    I go through this article,  The msg is very clear that, when a person wants to learn something, he must know what he is going to learn. One should be liberal & kind to all the creature. Very fine msg delivered, Kind Regards,

    Namo Bhudhey to all.

    • Kính bạch Thầy!

      Con xin phép được dịch comment của bạn đọc Dharam Pal đến từ thành phố Chandigarh, Ấn Độ như sau:

      “Kính bạch Thầy tâm linh tôn quý!

      Con đã đọc bài viết này rồi ạ. Những luận giảng trong bài viết rất rõ ràng. Con hiểu rằng khi ai đó muốn học điều gì thì họ nên hiểu họ thực sự đang học gì. Và họ học để đạt được giải thoát và có được tâm từ đối với mọi chúng sanh.

      Con cảm tạ ơn Thầy vì bài viết ý nghĩa.”

    • Nguyên Thành says:
      Nice comment!

      I look forward to reading more of your comments.

  5. Dr C H Lakshminarayan says:
    Om Mani Padme Hum

    Respected Guruji, I bow my head at your lotus feet.

    I would like to say Buddhism  aims at Nibbana  not on incarnation!

    It may not be correct to say that as Buddhism is based on scientific

    Facts, that Confucius only had a limited knowledge as he said: ” wait until you die and you will know the answer ” which is absolutely right and gives no room for  imagination and speculation.!

    Regarding vegetarianism. and non vegetarianism in Buddhism, I am of the opinion ‘ Begging ‘ itself is not good which induces in man laziness and easy going life. Man must work hard, sweat and earn his livelihood and by that he should judiciously choose  ‘vegetarian’ food because eating non vegetarian food knowingly  amounts to violation of one of the precepts (killing living beings) of Buddhism. People instead of Renunciation eating non vegetarian food which is not difficult simply argue and support and continue their  clinging to Non vegetarian food!

    The story related to ven. Dromtonpa and an old man is highly appreciated and a best example for ‘ Renunciation’ in the real sense which one should follow as a Buddhist Dharma Practicioner, not merely doing circumbulating temple,  chanting manthra and doing meditation with crossed legs!

    Finally, we have to remember and Practice Buddha’s teachings and golden words :

    Know what is needed to know

    Renounce what is needed to renounce

    Practice Dharma what is worth practicing

    Dr C H Lakshminarayan

    ( Tantra Nirvadeva )

    • Mật Diệu Hằng says:
      Kính bạch Thầy!

      Con xin phép được dịch comment của đạo hữu Tantra Nirvadeva ( CH Lakshminarayan) sang tiếng Việt như sau:

      “Om Mani Padme Hum.

      Kính bạch Thầy tâm linh tôn quý!

      Con cúi đầu đảnh lễ dưới chân sen của Thầy.

      Con hiểu rằng mục đích của đạo Phật là đạt được trạng thái Niết Bàn chứ không phải để hóa thân. Nếu nói rằng mục đích của đạo Phật là để hóa thân thì có thể không đúng bởi vì đạo Phật dựa trên khoa học.

      Trên thực tế, Khổng tử với kiến thức hạn chế của mình đã nói rằng: “đợi đến khi chết các người sẽ tự biết”, điều này hoàn toàn đúng thì sẽ không có chỗ cho sự quán xét, suy nghĩ và khả năng tưởng tượng.

      Nói về vấn đề chay mặn trong đạo Phật, con nghĩ rằng việc khất thực không phải là việc tốt bởi vì như vậy sẽ làm cho người tu lười biếng và cảm nhận cuộc sống quá dễ dàng. Con người nên lao động chăm chỉ để kiếm sống và họ sẽ ý thức trong việc chọn thực phẩm chay một cách sáng suốt bởi vì nếu ăn mặn có nghĩa là gián tiếp phạm một trong các giới cấm nhà Phật (giới cấm sát sinh). Con người thay vì xả ly việc ăn mặn mà điều này không khó thực hiện, nhưng trái lại họ lập luận ủng hộ, cổ súy và bám chấp vào việc ăn mặn.

      Câu chuyện về ngài Dromtonpa dạy cho một cụ già tín tâm  được đánh giá cao và là ví dụ minh họa tốt nhất cho thực nghĩa của “xả ly” mà người con Phật nên noi gương mà thực hành, không phải chỉ có đi nhiễu quanh tu viện, tụng kinh và tham thiền mới là thực hành pháp.

      Điều cuối cùng chúng con nên ghi nhớ và làm theo lời Phật dạy với những điều sau:

      “Biết những điều cần biết

      Xả ly những gì đáng xả ly

      Tu những pháp đáng tu.

      Con –  C H Lakshminarayan – Tantra Nirvadeva.”

    • Dear Tantra Nirvadeva,

      The Guru asked me to write some words with you related to vegetarian and non-vegetarian in Buddhism. I hope you have right view on this issue.

      For non-vegetarian eating, the Buddha affirmed in Vinaya, there is this rule (copied from Buddhist Monastic Code II): “I allow fish and meat that is pure in three respects: One has not seen, heard, or suspected (that it was killed on purpose for a bhikkhu).” — Mv.VI.31.14. It means that I did not see the living thing killed for me. I did not hear the living thing killed for me. I have no suspicion that the living thing was killed for me. In addition, in the sutra of Mahaprajna Paramita sutra, chapter 22: Guāngmíngbiànzhào noble Bodhisattva, the Buddha stated that Buddhists should not follow ascetic practices, they should follow the Middle Path. Therefore, Buddhist practitioners should stay content with modesty; retain the Path, taking solely wisdom as career, including stay content with food, stay content with medicine, stay content with seat, clothing and stay content with accommodation. The Buddha neither clung to vegetarian nor non-vegetarian, why do you cling to vegetarian?

      Being vegetarian does not mean you are definitely cultivating positive Karma or that eating meat means you are doing bad. Being vegetarian does not mean that you are more compassionate than eating meat. It still depends on the motivation and intention behind your eating. In fact, there may be a hundred insects in a cabbage, the vegetarian himself killed many beings while he eats a cabbage. But the meat of the dead buffalo is much enough for a hundred people. In India, 90% people eat vegetarian but according to the statistics, there happens a case of rape in every 30 minutes. And Adolf Hitler who was a strict vegetarian but he killed 5 millions Jewish people.

      In short, you should see everything with the right view according to the Buddha’s teaching.

      May all sentient beings be awaken in the ultimate state of enlightenment.

      Om Mani Padme Hum.

      ………………………………………………………………………….

      Thân gửi đạo hữu Tantra Nirvadeva,

      Thầy dạy tôi viết đôi lời với đạo hữu về vấn đề chay mặn trong đạo Phật. Tôi mong đạo hữu có chánh kiến trong vấn đề này.

      Về vấn đề ăn mặn, đức Phật đã chỉ rõ trong luật tạng rằng: “Phật tử được dùng Tam tịnh nhục với ba điều kiện: không thấy, không nghe và không nghi.” Có nghĩa là tôi không nhìn thấy con vật đó chết là do tôi, tôi không nghe thấy con vật đó chết là do tôi và tôi không hề có sự nghi ngờ rằng con vật đó chết là do tôi. Hơn nữa, trong kinh Đại Bát Niết Bàn, Phẩm Quang Minh Biến Chiếu Cao Quý Đức Vương Bồ Tát Thứ Hai Mươi Hai, đức Phật khẳng định Phật từ không nên tu khổ hạnh mà theo con đường Trung Đạo. Vì vậy, Phật tử nên đơn sơ gìn giữ đạo, trí tuệ là đạo nghiệp; đơn sơ với thực phẩm,  đơn sơ với thuốc men, đơn sơ với tọa cụ, y phục, đơn sơ với ngủ nghỉ. Đức Phật không hề bám chấp vào việc chay mặn, tại sao đạo hữu lại bám chấp vào việc ăn chay?

      Ăn chay không có nghĩa là đang tạo nghiệp tốt và ăn mặn không phải là đang làm điều gì xấu. Ăn chay không có nghĩa là từ bi hơn ăn mặn. Xấu hay tốt phụ thuộc vào động cơ và ý định đằng sau đó. Trên thực tế, có hàng trăm con sâu trên 1 cái bắp cải, 1 người ăn chay có thể giết chết hàng trăm  sinh vật. Nhưng thịt của một con trâu đã chết có thể đủ cho hàng trăm người. Ở Ấn Độ, 90% dân số ăn chay, nhưng theo thống kế thì cứ 30 phút lại xảy ra 1 vụ hãm hiếp. Và Adolf Hitler người ăn chay trường đã giết chết 5 triệu người dân do thái.

      Nói tóm lại, đạo hữu nên nhìn nhận vấn đề đúng theo chánh kiến và theo lời dạy của đức Phật.

      Cầu nguyện tất cả chúng sanh tỉnh thức với trạng thái giác ngộ.

      Om Mani Padme Hum.

       

  6. jnanadarshi Chakma says:
    Dear Holly Guru;

    This is a nice article and thank to you. I am so happy to read it where I learn about Buddha.

    With regard,

    • Kính bạch Thầy!

      Con xin phép được dịch comment của bạn đọc Jnanadarshi Chakma sang tiếng Việt như sau:

      “Kính bạch Thầy tâm linh tôn quý!

      Bài viết hay và ý nghĩa. Con cảm tạ ơn Thầy.

      Con rất hoan hỷ được đọc bài viết này và con đã biết được vì sao gọi là đức Phật.

      Con cầu nguyện Thầy thân tâm an tịnh”

  7. Erna Ho says:
    Dear Guru

    I have read this article and thank you so much for sharing to all of us. May you be well for the sake of all others and may we continue our path to enlightenment. May all beings be free from sufferings and achieve the happiness of Buddha’s nature.

    OM MANI PADME HUM

    • Kính bạch Thầy!

      Con xin phép được dịch comment của bạn đọc Erna Ho sang tiếng Việt như sau:

      “Kính bạch Thầy!

      Con đã đọc bài viết này ạ. Con cảm tạ ơn Thầy đã cho chúng con được đọc bài viết này.

      Con cầu nguyện Thầy trụ thế lâu dài vì sự lợi lạc của tất cả chúng sanh.

      Cầu nguyện chúng con luôn tinh tấn để được bước đi trên hành trình giác ngộ.

      Cầu nguyện tất cả chúng sanh đoạn trừ phiền não và thành tựu hạnh phúc của Phật tánh.

      Om Mani Padme Hum.”

  8. Tantra Upatissa says:
    Dear Guru thanks for sharing this article.

    This article tells us the importance of mantras, Yidam visualisation, Theory behind name of Buddha. Hope all beings practicising meditation would not get attached to eight worldly possessions. They meditate to liberate others beings and free them from suffering. This article gives a clear insight of beings in heaven.

     

    May Guru and his consort live long and protected and get enlightened.

    May all beings be free from suffering and get enlightened.

    Om Mani Padme Hum..

  9. Ahmed Khan says:

    Dear Guru,

    Thank you for sharing this article. It is very good and teaches wisdom,

    May all sentient beings become enlightened.

    Om Mani Padme Hum.

    • Kính bạch Thầy!

      Con xin phép được dịch comment của bạn đọc Ahmed Khan sang tiếng Việt như sau:

      “Kính bạch Thầy!

      Con cảm tạ ơn Thầy đã cho con được đọc bài viết này. Bài viết của Thầy hay, ý nghĩa và dạy con về trí tuệ Phật đà.

      Cầu nguyện tất cả chúng sanh đạt được giác ngộ tối thượng.

      Om Mani Padme Hum.”

  10. Dear holy Guru,
    I would like to express my gratitude for your clear and wonderful article of “why do we call him “the Buddha”? In this article, you make clarification to us how to get enlightenment in the simple way. It is “know what is needed to know, renounce what is needed to renounce and practice the dharma that is worth practicing”
    I have known that many people do not understand the precious human life is so short, they make many non-sense questions and pursue the non-sense goal in the life like fame, money. They do not make use of the short life to practice for liberation and true happiness. They often cling to the unimportant things like the appearance, the food and so on. They are Buddhists but they do not focus on practicing the dharma to develop bodhicitta and wisdom. They often make decision or judge everything and everyone around them based on their own thoughts. They do not use the lens of right view to find out the true nature of all things. They seem to look at everything with their own eyes of ego, hatred and greed. That is the reason why they are still in Samsara for a very long time. I am myself so lucky to meet you and have a good opportunity to learn from you to find the way out of Samsara and on the path to enlightenment.
    In addition, your clear explanations to become the Buddha proved the equality between the Buddha and all sentient beings, in which all sentient beings enable to become the Buddha if they go on the right path to liberation. As the teaching of Buddha says that “I am a Buddha, all sentient beings will become Buddhas.”
    Thank you so much for your nice and interesting article.
    May you and your consort have a good health and live long for the sake of all sentient beings.
    I also rejoice in the good deeds of Mat Nhat Nguyen who has translated your article into English. His wonderful English version supports to spread your teachings all over the world to benefit all sentient beings.
    May Mat Nhat Nguyen practice the dharma diligently to get inner happiness, success in life and social achievement for temporary happiness this life and ultimate bliss in Pure Land.
    May all sentient beings achieve the happiness of Buddha’s nature.
    Om Mani Padme Hum.

     

  11. Tantra Sutradaka says:

    Revered Gurujee

    Om Mani Padme Hum

    I bow before you

    It is a very thought provoking lesson hinging on the very basic principles of Buddhism and the related human life. Though it starts with the quarry about the nomenclature of Buddha and   Buddhism but comes down very soon to the Four Noble Truth and its related precepts and concepts. It tries to explain in minute detail regarding some rudimentary and indigenous thoughts of Buddhism that are unavailable in other religion and finally comes to the basic need of spiritual knowledge that is a precondition for perfection and happiness in this world and even after it. Eventually we find some narration of Buddhist ethics which is a precondition for a holy life leading to Nibbana as well instrumental in establishing social order, regulating the personal and family life as well as a harbinger of peace, prosperity, and perfection in life, family and society.

    I am really grateful to our holy Guru and my friend for sending this lesson.

    May all sentient beings be happy by my earned merits.

    Long live my Guru along with his concert and my all Dhamma friends

    Om Mani Padme Hum

    Avinash Kumar Srivastava

     

    • Nguyên Thành says:
      I agree with you that practicing the Buddha’s teachings leads human beings to peace, prosperity, and perfection in life, family and society as well as helps us get the true happiness.
      • Avinash Kumar Srivastava says:
        Revered Gurujee

        Om Mani Padme Hum

        I bow before your lotus feet and pray for your compassonate eyes on me

        I am grateful to you for your reply on a trivial comment given by a very small person having a little knowledge of the Buddha and Buddhism. It is your humility that you make every one,whether big or small, feel your affection and be closer to you

        Om Mani Padme Hum

        In expectation of the same compasson in future.

        Reverently yours

        Tantras Sutradaka ( Avinash Kumar Srivastava)

         

         

         

  12. Mật Phê Rô says:

    Mô Phật !

    Mật Phê Rô hoan hỷ thiện hạnh chuyển ngữ bài viết : VÌ SAO GỌI LÀ ĐỨC PHẬT sang tiếng Anh của đạo hữu Mật Nhất Nguyên  giúp bạn đọc nước ngoài có duyên lành tiếp cận với chanhtuduy.com .

    Cầu nguyện đạo hữu luôn được hạnh phúc tự tâm , hanh thông thế sự , thành đạt xã hội .

    Con cầu nguyện Thầy Cô sức khỏe , trường thọ vì đại nghiệp hoằng dương chánh pháp , làm lợi lạc tất cả chúng sanh .

    Cầu nguyện tất cả chúng sanh được nương tựa bóng lành Thầy , Phật , Pháp , Tăng .

    Om Mani Padme Hum !

  13. Dear Holy Guru,

    I deeply rejoice to read your article: “Why do we call him “The Buddha” ?”. I would like to express my gratitude for your teaching. I rejoice in Mat Nhat Nguyen’s good deed of translation. His translation supports to flourish your discourse all over the world for the sake of all sentient beings.

    May you and your consort live long for the sake of all sentient beings.

    May Mat Nhat Nguyen have a good health, overcome difficulties in life and make progress on the path to enlightenment.

    May all sentient beings achieve the happiness of the Buddha’s nature.

    Om Mani Padme Hum!

  14. Dr C H Lakshminarayan says:
    Dear May Dieu Hang,

    This,I feel, nonvegetarians  self supporting themselves their actions of eating meat of killed animals and calling it as right view !(by putting so many arguments like a lawyer in the court of law!).

    Any way killing the living beings is killing whether it is for mm sake or other’s which is against the  basic five precepts of Buddhism.

    Your question ‘ why you cling to vegetarian? ‘ is similar or as good as asking like ‘ why you cling to Dharma practices? Follow the middle path’

    Better we stop argue and counter argue on this subject and hurt one’s feelings  pressuming both views are right views!

    Sorry if I have hurted the feelings of nonvegetarians.

    Your’s sincerely,

    Tantra Nirvadeva.

    • Nguyên Thành says:

      No, every learners can present their ideas! Problem is rigth views! What did Bhudha teach? Wisdom is most important, no eating! He is not a nonvegetarians! We are the disciples so must follow! “‘ why you cling to vegetarian?” is not ” why you cling to Dharma practices? ” beacouse vegetarian is nót Dharma practices! If some ones is not agree, please dont read on chanhtuduy.com, and will not be my learners!

      Thinley- Nguyen Thanh

    • Kính bạch Thầy!

      Con xin phép được dịch comment của đạo hữu Tantra Nirvadeva  ( C H Lakshminarayan) sang tiếng Việt như sau:

      “Gửi đạo hữu Mật Diệu Hằng,

      Đối với vấn đề này, tôi cảm nhận những người ăn mặn tự bản thân họ đã gián tiếp ủng hộ việc sát sinh động vật và gọi đó là có chánh kiến (điều này đã được đưa ra nhiều luận cứ để bảo vệ cho việc ăn mặn như một luật sư trước phiên tòa).

      Tuy nhiên sát sinh vẫn là sát sinh cho dù hành vi đó có vì lợi ích của người khác, và điều này vẫn là phạm giới cấm sát sinh của Phật giáo.

      Câu hỏi của đạo hữu hỏi tôi “tại sao đạo hữu lại bám chấp vào việc ăn chay?” cũng tương tự như câu hỏi tại sao đạo hữu lại bám chấp vào việc thực hành pháp? Hãy theo con đường Trung đạo.

      Theo tôi nghĩ, tốt hơn là chúng ta nên ngừng cuộc đối luận ở đây để tránh làm tổn thương nhau và cùng chấp nhận luận điểm của nhau.

      Tôi xin lỗi nếu tôi làm tổn thương những người ăn mặn.

      Trân trọng!

      Tantra Nirvadeva.”

       

  15. Sonam Tshering says:
    Dear Guru,

    I have no word to express my gratitude for this article. It is just Wow!

    May holy guru live long.

    Om Mani Padme Hung

    • Kính bạch Thầy!

      Con xin phép được dịch comment của bạn đọc Sonam Tshering sang tiếng Việt như sau:

      “Kính bạch Thầy!

      Con không biết dùng lời nào để diễn tả lòng biết ơn của con đối với Thầy khi Thầy cho con được đọc bài viết này. Thực sự là một bài viết quá tuyệt vời. Sau khi đọc xong bài viết này con chỉ biết thốt lên một từ: wow!

      Con cầu nguyện Thầy trụ thế lâu dài.

      Om Mani Padme Hum.”

  16. Tantra Maruta says:
    Dear Holy Guru,

    Blessings and peace to all brothers and sisters.

    Such a great privelege to read this article that it induce every reader the knowledge of who Buddha is, and what particular instructions to follow to avoid ignorance. Humans are fond of commiting things that alleviate their boredom or sufferings in life most of the times. They chose certain activities to divert themselves from problems. The hard thing comes up when they are not aware that where they cling to would certainly push them more into samsara. Thus, putting their soul further away from Nirvana.

    Knowing the BUDDHA, not just by name but through his path towards enlightenment has been a good way of developing Bodichita. Embracing the Dharma and be accessible to Sangha, spread kindness to humanity, has been the key to open the gate to Nirvana.

    May all sentient beings be in peace and far from sufferings.

    I am Tantra Maruta, from the Philippines.

    Om Mani Padme Hum

  17. Jaison Chakma says:
    Dear holy Guru

    At first I bow to you and pay my homage.

    Very nice and important article.Reading the article,I came to why the Buddha is called Buddha.
    I also came to know what should I know and what not to.

    Here, it’s mentioned that which things are limited in Confucius.

    Thank you very much for sharing the precious article.

    Om Mani Padme Hum.

    • Kính bạch Thầy!

      Con xin phép được dịch comment của bạn đọc Jaison Chakma sang tiếng Việt như sau:

      “Kính bạch Thầy tâm linh tôn quý!

      Trước hết, con xin được cúi đầu đảnh lễ trước Thầy.

      Bài viết của Thầy hay, lợi lạc và chỉ ra những điều quan trọng. Sau khi đọc bài viết này, con hiểu được vì sao gọi là đức Phật.

      Bên cạnh đó, con hiểu được con nên biết những gì cần biết. Con hiểu thêm rằng những kiến thức trong đạo Khổng còn rất hạn chế.

      Con chân thành cảm tạ ơn Thầy vì đã cho con được đọc bài viết quý báu này.

      Om Mani Padme Hum.”

    • Nguyên Thành says:
      I am happy to read your comment. Please read more.
  18. Mật Thái Hòa says:
    Kính Bạch Thầy.

    Con hoan hỷ tán thán thiện hạnh của đạo hữu Mật Nhất Nguyên đã chuyển ngữ bài viết của Thầy sang tiếng Anh, ngõ hầu giúp cho chúng sanh hữu ở nước ngoài được tiếp cận với ánh sáng chánh pháp của Đức Phật ngang qua những bài viết trên chanhtuduy.com tại Mật gia song Nguyễn, để được cơ hội bước đi trên con đường giải thoát giác ngộ thành Phật.

    Con cầu nguyện cho sức khỏe và sự trường thọ của Thầy Cô vì hạnh phúc của chúng sanh.

    Cầu mong cho con tất cả chúng sanh uống được tinh túy cam lồ.

    Om Mani Padme Hum.

  19. Tantra Kasila(Vivek R S) says:
    Dear holy Guru

    It was a great article..One striking point is that know you want to know all other things are of no use.It is better not to know some things.If we are learning something be the master.Quoting a sentence said by Picasso,,”I wanted to be a painter so I became Picasso”

    If we do not know what is the reason for suffering and keep on doing different things there won’t be any use.The treatment should be for the cause/root for the sufferings.

    May the Guru live long and all the sentinel beings have the peacefulness and calmness of Buddha.

    • Kính bạch Thầy!

      Con xin phép được dịch comment của đạo hữu Tantra Kasila (Vivek R S) sang tiếng Việt như sau:

      “Kính bạch Thầy tâm linh tôn quý!

      Bài viết này thật tuyệt vời. Một điểm quan trọng con ghi nhớ trong bài viết này là biết những điều cần biết, còn những điều không đi vào trọng tâm thì tìm hiểu cũng không có tác dụng gì. Nếu thực sự muốn học, hiểu rõ một vấn đề gì và trở thành chuyên gia thì tốt hơn là không nên tìm hiểu những điều không liên quan. Như Picasso đã từng nói: “Tôi muốn là họa sĩ và tôi trở thành Picassa.”

      Cũng vậy, nếu chúng con không biết nguyên nhân gây khổ mà cứ tìm hiểu những vấn đề không liên quan thì cũng chẳng được gì. Bởi vì khi hiểu được nguyên nhân gây khổ thì mới có phương pháp điều trị để đoạn trừ phiền não.

      Con cầu nguyện Thầy trụ thế lâu dài.

      Cầu nguyện tất cả chúng sanh được bình an và thành tựu hạnh phúc Phật tánh.”

    • Nguyên Thành says:

      Yes, it is true. You should remember the three important things:

      Know what is needed to know

      Renounce what is needed to renounce

      Practice the Dharma that is worth practicing.

      • Tantra Kasila(Vivek R S) says:
        Dear Guru

        It’s really great to hear these things from you.Buddhism is the true medicine for this crippled world.

         

  20. Avinash Kumar Srivastava says:
    Revered Gurujee

    Om Mani Padme Hum

    I bow before your lotus feet and pray for your compassonate eyes on me

    I am grateful to you for your reply on a trivial comment given by a very small person having a little knowledge of the Buddha and Buddhism. It is your humility that you make every one,whether big or small, feel your affection and be closer to you

    Om Mani Padme Hum

    In expectation of the same compasson in future.

    Reverently yours

    Tantras Sutradaka ( Avinash Kumar Srivastava)

     

     

     

  21. Susan says:
    Hello Guru.

    Many thankss for your article. You are so hard working to write this.

    I also want to know what is needed to know.

     

    I have wast so much time to do meanless things.

    Hope I  will know how to give up meanless things.

     

     

    Best regards

    Thankss

     

    • Nguyên Thành says:

      I like your this comment

    • Kính bạch Thầy!

      Con xin phép dịch comment của bạn đọc Susan sang tiếng Việt như sau:

      “Kính bạch Thầy!

      Con cảm tạ ơn Thầy đã cho con được đọc bài viết này. Thầy đã nhiệt tâm viết một bài viết hay, ý nghĩa. Đọc xong bài này con cũng muốn học cách biết những gì cần biết. Bởi vì con đã phí quá nhiều thời gian vào những điều vô nghĩa. Con mong rằng con sẽ biết cách từ bỏ được những điều vô  nghĩa đó.

      Con cảm tạ ơn Thầy!”

  22. Susan says:
    Hello
  23. TantraMikaya says:
    dear holy guru. Thank you for the explanation in your article why we do call him Buddha. This article was very interesting because often the question is also here why do people call him Buddha and what is Buddha. People in the West often believe Buddha is a stature and this stature stands for wealth. In your article you have described very sensitively and instructively Buddha and what and who is Buddha. When I first became involved with Buddhism, I found peace and quiet and then opened a world of very wise and compassionate knowledge. Often I thought at the beginning when I saw Buddhists that they looked outward as if they had no emotions. But I saw a lot of kindness and compassion and infinite knowledge. I understood that our mind needs to be clear to not react hectically or stressed because only a clear mind with mindfulness works well. It was through the Dharma and the many wise articles and books that I became aware that each of us, regardless of race, age, or skin color, can practice the Dharma. Importantly, our holy guru taught us to recite daily and practice the Dharma. The meditations are an important starting point, because thoughts come from our mind and then turn into actions. If we positively influence our mind then we can do positive things as well. this in turn leads to positive karma. So each of us has the opportunity to transform ourselves and to go the way of liberation by enriching knowledge. Buddhism is not just a religion or philosophy of life, it helps us and strengthens the peaceful treatment of compassion and love for one another. Purifying our mind through meditation is wholesome and relaxing. So I spoke here in Berlin with psychotherapists who now also study Buddhist teachings themselves to help patients want. Because even these therapists have understood that positive transformation can heal and no medicine in tablet form can do this cure. Buddha is in each of us, Buddha is nature and Buddha is medicine. You holy Guru are Buddha and I bow to you with deep respect. May the Dharma take root in the whole world and spread with love and compassion. May all creatures be free of suffering. May our holy Guru life long for the sake of all sentient beings. May all beings achieve the happiness of Buddha’s nature. om Mani Padme Hum
  24. Elana Dower says:

    Thank you Guru for sharing this,

    The artwork is very beautiful and compliments this message in your letter so well. We all have the potential for Buddha’s nature within us.

    May I ask where the artwork is from? When was it painted and by whom?

    Om Mani Padme Hum

  25. Steve Rogers says:

    Dear Holy Guru

    I am Tantra Haramitra

    what a beautiful teaching you have given us. This is the third time I’ve read it and it clearly gives me a path to follow. It gives me a clear direction and makes me realise how rewarding practicing the Dharma is.

    I am blessed that this teaching has been given, by yourself Holy Guru, to myself and my family that comes to this site.

    I pray that you will maintain a healthy life and live long to continue your guidance for the benefit of all sentient beings

    thank you

    Om mani padme hum

    • Kính bạch Thầy!

      Con xin phép được dịch comment của đạo hữu Tantra Haramitra (Steve Rogers) sang tiếng Việt như sau:

      “Kính bạch Thầy tâm linh tôn quý!

      Con là Tantra Haramitra.

      Thầy đã ban cho chúng con bài giảng tuyệt vời. Con đã đọc bài này 3 lần và bài viết này đã chỉ cho con rõ ràng con đường mà con nên đi theo. Bài viết chỉ ra cho con đường hướng rõ ràng và giúp con nhận ra những điều tốt đẹp mà việc thực hành pháp mang lại cho con.

      Con thấy  bản thân và các đạo hữu ở Mật gia thật ơn phước khi được đọc những lời dạy của Thầy tôn quý thông qua các bài viết trên trang nhà.

      Con cầu nguyện cho sức khỏe và sự trường thọ của Thầy và những lời dạy của Thầy được lan tỏa mang đến lợi lạc cho tất cả chúng sanh.

      Con cảm tạ ơn Thầy!

      Om Mani Padme Hum.”

  26. Aman says:
    Impressive teaching

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